TEDsters Read My Blog From These 71 Countries

Connecting the World while Speaking TEDish…

According to WordPress,TEDsters read my blog from these 71 countries this year (until today) … in bold: the 16 countries of this particular list where I have been to:

United States, Hungary, United Kingdom, Sweden, Brazil, Germany, Thailand, Canada, Australia, Netherlands, India, Azerbaijan, Israel, Singapore, Malta, Czech Republic, Japan, Qatar, Portugal, Greece, Romania, Italy, United Arab Emirates, Denmark, Indonesia, Turkey, France, Croatia, Pakistan, Belgium, Austria, Korea, Russian Federation, Iceland, Lithuania, Finland, Slovakia, Spain, Bulgaria, Ukraine, Bolivia, Ireland, Taiwan (Province of China), Malaysia, Algeria, Peru, Argentina, Switzerland, Luxembourg, South Africa, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Guadeloupe, Lebanon, Kuwait, Oman, Mexico, Nigeria, Viet Nam, Poland, Nepal, Morocco, Kenya, Republic of Moldova, Afghanistan, Senegal, Sri Lanka, and New Zealand (and a bit later: Macedonia… 72 countries):

Hello everyone! 🙂 Thank you for reading my blog! (Update: On 31 December of 2012 it was 87 countries!)

Earth's Aurora and ISS

Earth’s Aurora and ISS (Photo credit: Lights In The Dark)

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Regina Saphier TED Global 2012 Day 4

Imogen Heap - Ellipse

Imogen Heap – Ellipse (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Friday, June 29, 2012

9:45 – 11:15

Session 11:

Taking Another Look

Maurizio Seracini

Art Diagnostician

See what is below the surface… very interesting. Discovering the deep layers of paintings… We get to see an app that helps you find hidden details of paintings at exhibitions…

Becci Manson

Photo Retoucher

Giving back photo memories to people in Japan after the tsunami…

Mina Bissell

Cancer Researcher

How come Obama‘s trillions of cells know what to do? Why does his nose not turn into his foot…? Context and architecture… the micro environment is what matters… inject one cancer cell into an embrio: no cancer… inject the same cancer cell in a chicken: and you get cancer growth. Milk production is the same… the cells forget to produce milk when taken out of context… Restore tissue architecture… what is structurally wrong with the cells and their environment… This is a wonderful and hope giving talk… especially to me… because my mother and father are cancer survivors… my mother is still in the process of fighting… I wish medicine advanced faster… and at the same time I see wonderful new discoveries, like the one Mina and her students are working on.

A short audience talk:

Ryan Merkley… popcorn video

Imogen Heap

Diva

Interesting and fun performance: make your music with your body. Imogen is wearing a dress and gloves that help her to compose music while singing and moving around on stage.

John Wilbanks

Data Commons Advocate

Clinical studies and informed consent… We need to connect clinical studies’ data to be more innovative… build commons of our medical data… share your data voluntarily… like: lifestyle, food, genome, illnesses in the family … don’t be patient!

For breast cancer research: http://athenacarenetwork.org/

12:00 – 13:45

Session 12:

Public Sphere

Kirby Ferguson

Filmmaker and Remixer

Everything is a remix. – he says and shows us several examples, like Steve Jobs and his ideas… Steve used to present inventions as his own… as his company’s… but truth is, many of those technologies were around before he got to know about them… he loved to take from others and pretended it was his, but hated when other people took ideas from him…

Michael Anti

Blogger

How 300 000 million tweeting Chinese people, a number that covers the US population, change Chinese society… Due to the language, Chinese regard tweeting as a true media… it has more content there, because Chinese is a very complex language, giving you lots of context. For Chinese people censorship and working around it is: normal. I think Michael has a lot of courage…

Andrew Blum

Network Author

Andrew showed us how physical the internet really is. He even showed us a picture where a man walked out of the ocean with a fiber optical cable and we got to see how this extremely long cable was connected to the cable network on land… The internet is not weightless he says… it is not a virtual thing… it is very physical and it connects you and me physically, even if also by the power of electricity, light and the like.

Margaret Heffernan

Management Thinker

Willful Blindness: Why We Ignore the Obvious at Our Peril

Childhood cancer rates growing… Why? 1956 research finding… Mothers in affluent families got x-rayed while pregnant in high numbers. Only 25 years later was the practice eliminated. Openness is not enough to make the change. Allison and George… (sorry, but did not get the full names…) The point is: Allison was sure she was right about her discovery because her research partner, George had this approach: he tested her hypothesis and findings by trying to show that she was wrong. And since he could not show that she was wrong, their professional argument made the results really powerful. But still it took the profession decades to get it, because they were not open for the truth.

Willful Blindness: Why We Ignore the Obvious at Our Peril [Hardcover]
Margaret Heffernan (Author)

Most organizations are not thinking. They can not think… they are too afraid to face conflict. 85% of officials are unable to face and manage conflict, so they avoid meaningful confrontations. (Like Chris at TED…) Solution: see conflict as thinking, learn to argue and become very good at it. Margaret tells us a story how one person can find others in an organization who have the same concerns and so as a group they can break the silence, confront the leaders, and make the change together. The CEO usually has NO idea what is going on… It is true! Face this truth. Become a leader.

Stand up to authority. The truth will set us free when we develop the talent and moral capacity to stand up for that truth in front of other people, but with a working strategy. Openness is the beginning. First make sure, that you are right, get equipped with tools of arguing, learn to face social pressure and speak up. Organizations must also learn to embrace these people and these opinions. This approach makes organizations safer.

Well Chris Anderson did not award my truth telling! So, TED: open up! Hire Margaret to teach you a thing or two about facing conflict within or regarding TED and face difficult truth to grow. Stop ignoring, silencing, uninviting and disregarding people who help you build the image of TED as volunteers and who have the courage to tell you the truth when you screw up. It is easy to embrace the uncritically enthusiastic followers… but it is hard to listen to people like me. You know what I am talking about Chris…

However, I have to say, this TED Global was wonderful! 🙂 Thank you! I am sure you can take in that opinion. Thank you TED people, I can live with the fact that you are humans, lightness and darkness… we all are. 🙂 During the closing remarks Chris was trying to say how the TED Global audience was wonderful this year and Bruno kind of told him on stage that what he wanted to say was: the TED Global audience was better compared to the TED Long Beach audience… that was an awkward moment for sure… but one thing is definitely true: Bruno is a more reliable, more even tempered curator… This time I did not have the feeling that TED was in a content crisis.

Daria Musk

Web Music Sensation

Daria is telling and singing the story of her wonderful Google+ HangOut stardom. She is singing You Move Me! 🙂 while her hangout friends are on screen in the background. This is so special and so representative of what is going on in the world today in my global network. And this connectedness is growing every day.

How a lonely girl earned 1.6 million friends: Daria Musk at TEDGlobal 2012

Clay Shirky

Social Media Theorist

In this age, you can no longer get away with being stupid… You will be exposed if you are a narrow minded public servant or politician for example.

Brilliant game changer, Linus Torvalds is mentioned… LINUX… Get a GitHub account… collaboration without coordination… Expect not to be censored and use technology to speak up and influence society and politics… It is your world. Make it better as you can. And yes, you can!

Regina Saphier TED Global 2012 Day 3

English: Portrait of Jane McGonigal

Portrait of Jane McGonigal (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Thursday, June 28, 2012

12:00 – 13:45

Session 8:

Talk to Strangers

There was a major technical issue in Edinburgh. We had no idea at the time if the power comes back or not until the next session. We sure hoped so.

Update: the power is back and session 9 starts at 3:15 Budapest time. Jane got to complete her fun and empowering talk in session 9.

After Session 10. update: Jane had to do a retake of her talk’s first part, because the power outage destroyed the first part of her original talk… High drama… we felt the stress… we were with her as she walked on stage at the end of the day and re-recorded her first few minutes… and the stream was cut suddenly again and we were in the dark… for a while we had no idea if she was ok and if it was only us being cut off, or if the power was gone again in the building of the TED conference… I kept asking and we were informed that she was ok, and she was able to record her talk just fine finally… My sympathy for this pro speaker! Jane is a warrior! Hope to see her talk online soon.

Rachel Botsman

Sharing Innovator

I know Rachel from the RSA lectures. She talks about the age of online trust between strangers. Collaborative consumption on a global scale, using technology. Your reputation in this age is key. Service networking… outsourcing your tasks: taskrabbit… assembling IKEA furniture and earning 5000 dollars a month… Facebook users trust each other, she says, so they have the potential for trust based online collaboration. How do you ensure safety, how do you handle real and online identity? Should your reputation travel with you from one site to another? Manage your reputation capital! It is very valuable. Because would it not be wonderful if the truly trustworthy would run the world?

She also mentioned:

http://stackoverflow.com/

https://trustcloud.com/

http://launch.connect.me/

https://airbnb.com/

Robin Chase

Transport Networker

Robin’s story: from Zipcar, to Buzzcar… from uniform cars that you can use in the US, to people’s cars that you can share in Paris. She calls this phenomenon: Peers Incorporated. It is a world of innovation, personalization, collaboration, and economies of scale. It is not self evident how such a system is built, but she now knows how it works. The peer production community needs quick feedback tools that are in place. Supercharging Individuals.

Amy Cuddy

Social Psychologist

High testosterone and low cortisol are the key to top leadership… Be powerful, but do not get nervous … Role change can change your hormone level. Fake it until you become it! Amy becomes truly vulnerable when she is telling us that her career was broken by a car accident and it took her 4 years longer to get her college degree, but more importantly it took a lot of faking until she made it back on track as a gifted academic. She needed her wonderful mentor to push her to stay in the game and when she had the chance as a mentor to do the same for a discouraged young woman in her class, she told her the same: you have a place here, and you should fake it until you become it.

So, the practical take home parts of this talk: before you enter a judgment situation, like a job interview, in the elevator or in the bathroom, stand up, spread your arms high in a V, smile, imagine you are strong, and tell yourself you will be successful. Smile! And this helps you to do better or even give your best, because your posture, your facial expression, your words go deep in your brain and change the outcome of your efforts. Take the power pose! This was a truly moving TED talk with very important content.

Jason McCue

Lawyer

People who were hurt by terrorist attacks, should be better supported to live a more normal life. I really do not understand why this talk had to be placed into this session. Terribly out of place among so many positive messages. It is important, yes, it has a place in the conference, just not in this session. Especially after Amy’s brilliant, vulnerable and uplifting talk. A very bad curatorial decision, after a really good one… actually a lot of very good ones.

Marco Tempest

Techno-illusionist

Jane McGonigal

Game Designer

As our old friend Jane tells her story of a head injury and promises us 7 extra minutes of life, the power goes out in Edinburgh, but we have no clue what happened, and the live TED conference chat goes wild trying to figure out why the stream is gone… and I am thinking, this reminds me of the power outage in Oxford a few years back.. and sure enough, it is a major power outage, but in the city of Edinburgh. We hope Jane gets to finish her talk, and we get our 7 extra minutes of a gamer’s life. 🙂

Here is Jane’s first TED talk with my Hungarian subtitle: http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/hu/jane_mcgonigal_gaming_can_make_a_better_world.html

Jane finishes her talk at the beginning of Session 9. so I continue my blog note:

Priorities change when you make a comeback from a trauma or illness.

I do what makes me happy, I know who I am, get a new sense of me, better able to focus on what is important. Trauma helps you live a more authentic life, and have fewer regrets at the end of your life. Jane playfully teaches us to work on our physical, mental, emotional and social resilience and live 10 years longer. She in fact developed a game, called SuperBetter to help herself get better and here she is, giving us this inspiring TED talk. She is always creative, even when she is ill and her brain tells her to kill herself. I know how it feels to be so ill… feeling desperate.

Why is this talk so meaningful to me? Well… during the second part of my thirties I have been severely ill and the illness demolished my career as an NGO founder and director. I suffered from chronic fatigue syndrome and it took three years of my life. I have become completely isolated, because people did not understand what happened to me, including my doctors. The person working 18 hours a day and enjoying her work, turned into a recluse in pain, unable to do much. That person was me. So, I set out online to find the cause of my illness and read thousands of medical articles in English (on pubmed, etc.). I did finally manage to find the cause of my illness (a major part: severe lack of “vitamin” D due to too much work and lack of sun). I recovered, but for a long time I felt this deep fear that I might get sick again. The TED talks, the TED conferences, my own TED translations and my own TED blogs were my hope giving tasks. The TED phenomenon helped me to keep up my mental, emotional and social resilience. (“Vitamin” D gave me my physical resilience and strengths back. And so much more… read about this “vitamin”! It is not even a vitamin!) Therefore I am completely able to understand and feel why Jane’s game for recovery is so helpful. And I am glad we both recovered! 🙂

Note: if you did not read the into of this day: Jane had to do a retake of her talk’s first part, because the power outage destroyed the first part of her original talk… High drama…

3:15 – 5:00

Session 9:

The Upside of Transparency

Parag Khanna

Global Theorist; Guest Host at TEDGlobal 2012

Sanjay Pradhan

Development Leader

I am still under the influence of Jane’s talk, so I am sorry, I am unable to pay attention to Sanjay’s emotional talk…

Beth Noveck

Open-Government Expert

How to use technology and data to get things done… Delivering better information… US patent applications will be totally open to all of us to influence them, globally… Demand this revolution!

Heather Brooke

Investigative Journalist

Grow up society, and demand secret documents now. Heather did that and heads fell in the British Parliament, by the dozen! Lets make officials accountable for not revealing public interest information. Iceland is becoming a safe and open place for data publication for all of us.

She suggested these sites for good use by citizens (the first one had Hungary listed on the left side):

http://www.alaveteli.org/

http://www.asktheeu.org/

http://www.investigativedashboard.org/

……

Marc Goodman

Global Security Futurist

Marc shows us how useful everyday technology is used by criminals too. Like 3D printing… or what about DNA… personalized attacks… Our security system is outdated. Open source global security… I really like Marc.

Deyan Sudjic

Curator

Talking about transparency and opacity in design, city planing, architecture and every day life.

6:00 – 7:45

Session 10:

Reframing

Sarah Slean

Musician

Singing her song: Lucky me! … about living today and being ready for science. 🙂

Laura Snyder

Science Historian

Darwin started his discovery journey as a natural philosopher and came back as a scientist, because the word was born around his time… As women got admitted into science circles in the past… today: people must be incorporated into the field of science.

John Maeda

Artist

Funny play with letters, sound, typeface, movement… Art is enigmatic… “You do not get it? Good.” – he says. It is what it is all about. Also, leadership is about connecting unlikely entities and see what happens… and you can use visual network analysis technology to understand your system, connections, groups and people in the system. Interesting talk.

Michael Hansmeyer

Computational Architect

Folding simple shapes into intricate, beautiful forms never seen before by using simple algorithms and 3D printing them. Awesome! 🙂 WOW! I believe the people there in the room do not grasp what they have seen now. My best friend is an architect and an artist… I have been “trained” in this field… I know that this was fantastic!

Ramesh Raskar

Femtophotographer

Taking pictures of light at really high speed and sensing light reflections for… safety for example… this talk was fantastic too.

Boaz Almog

Quantum Researcher

Quantum “levitation”… quantum locking with magnetic field and super conductors… not levitation… and of course Sapphire is also part of the phenomenon… 😉

Video: http://worldsciencefestival.com/videos/introducing_quantum_levitation

Keith Chen

Behavioral Economist

Chinese language does not divide tenses… it rained yesterday, it rained today, it rained tomorrow… so, if present and future are the same for you, it is easier to save. At least this is Keith’s theory and the numbers and data analysis suggest: he might be right. Future-less language speakers are the best savers. They have a continuous existence.

Hungarian is a “futured” language, unfortunately, so perception of time is divided. Hungary’s savings are just under 25%.

Future-less “nations” and their people are more likely to be healthy, play it safe and save. Do I feel so out of place in Hungary, because I started to adopt German at 17 and English since 24? No… I just simply feel out of place here since… since I was born…

And when I assumed my day was over, I find this article on BigThink with a funny Hungarian stamp as an illustration:

Obese? Smoker? No Retirement Savings? Perhaps It’s Because of the Language You Speak

http://bigthink.com/Mind-Matters/obese-smoker-no-retirement-savings-perhaps-its-because-of-the-language-you-speak

“No Retirement Savings? Perhaps It’s Because of the Language You Speak”  – “Illustration: 1958 Hungarian postage stamp of a (perhaps strong-FTR speaking) grasshopper partying away for the summer while the (maybe weak-FTR-speaking) ants prepare for winter. Hungarian, by the way, is a strong-FTR language.”

And here is the working paper under review:

The Effect of Language on Economic Behavior: Evidence from
Savings Rates, Health Behaviors, and Retirement Assets
M. Keith Chen∗
Yale University, School of Management and Cowles Foundation

Hungarians are bad at saving... are they cut off from their future due to language?

Figure 2 shows average total savings rates, accounting for both private and government consumption. Data
from before 1985 are included in the regressions below but excluded here to normalize time periods across
countries. Both Switzerland and Belgium have significant within-country FTR variation; for simplicity they
are shaded according to their majority-FTR status. Difference in means are computed using a OLS regression
where observations are clustered at the country level.

Hannah Brock

Guzheng Virtuoso

Regina Saphier TED Global 2012 Day 2

English: Neil Harbisson and his eyeborg implan...

Neil Harbisson and his eyeborg implant. World’s first cyborg recognized as such by a government. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

9:45 – 11:15

Session 4:

Globality

Pankaj Ghemawat

Globalization Thinker

So, just how globalized is the world. Well, it is at 10-20 % only! For example, international, cross border phone calls are at 2% only. Businesses created by immigrants globally only at 3%. Foreign direct investment globally is below 10%. Export / GDP somewhere at 20%… And in all cases survey participants hugely overestimate these numbers when guessing. Like the French, who think their country is “suffering” from a 24% immigrant population, while it is in fact only 8%. That latter number changes perception. People in the US think that foreign aid in the national budget is 30%, while it is only 1%. Pankaj says: Radical Openness is a nice title for a TED conference, but truth is, incremental openness would already be an achievement. People on Facebook have only 10-15% of their friends located outside of their geographical region or country.

Pankaj Ghemawat

Pankaj Ghemawat (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Robert Neuwirth

Author

He talks about DIY economy… Robert points out that the informal economy is growing and it is a huge part of the world economy all together.

Andreas Schleicher

Education Surveyor

Korea not so long ago was a sad country, and now every young Korean finishes high school… Wonderful! My question: but what about the record numbers of suicides among Korean intellectuals? Perhaps the large class sizes are low cost but also dehumanizing and overly competitive? What about the hikikomori population of Japan?

The PISA Test and Hungary… according to one chart, we are doing ok… but I would disagree with Andreas immediately! And a new chart comes up and we are in the red (lower left part of the chart in red)… we spend little on our education… high socioeconomic disparity, low average performance and guess what, and this is my news for you: high levels of suicide, alcoholism and depression. Extremely depressing country to live in, I should know. I call it the Mediterranean Balkan.

Still, the data Andreas showed, is very interesting and useful for comparison and for finding what works (statistically, not necessarily humanly, in my opinion). But actually PISA stats are distorted, because it depends for example on the schools where the tests are done… not always representative of the other schools in a country.

Natasha Paremski

Pianist

Classical music for a change… nice. 🙂 Too short… need more…

Alex Salmond

First Minister of Scotland

For small nations, it is not the economic size that matters, rather it is the power of their ambition. He showed us a chart with small countries that recovered easily from the global crisis… well, Hungary is NOT one of them, unfortunately. Hungary is a nation suffering terribly… and has always been suffering…

12:00 – 13:45

Session 5:

Shades of Openness

Malte Spitz

Politician and Data Activist

EU citizens to mobile companies: Do not retain our data. He asked his phone provider to send him what they are storing about him. Finally, after some struggle, he got it and he put it online. Companies are constantly trying to track us. We have to fight for our independence every day. Privacy is a value of the twenty first century. Just because these companies are able to retain all this info about you, they should not do so. Ask your company: What kind of data are you storing about me?

Ivan Krastev

Public intellectual

Finally, it is not Hungary, but Bulgaria: the most pessimistic nation! They voted with blank ballots saying: We have no leaders to vote for! Thank you! Tell politicians that we are not idiots, we know when there is no choice. Ivan, who has no mobile phone, says that we now get facebook revolutions. Do you believe that well informed, decent and talented people will run for office? Chris says, he now understands why Bulgarians translated all TED talks… they were looking for hope.

Gerard Senehi

Experimental Mentalist

Some spoon bending at TED… I did that with Uri Geller years ago… I have no idea how that worked… we were standing in a regular kitchen in Oxford… he picked up a spoon, asked me to hold it, and asked me to put my finger on it… he in turn put his finger on mine and the spoon was bent immediately… I suspect he gave that set of utensils to the host in the past… but it did not change shape when I touched it alone… go figure… I still have that distorted spoon by the way…

Gabriella Coleman

Digital Anthropologist

Anonymous is protecting the freedom of the internet. A visible and invisible group at the same time. Team work. Gabriella is practicing ethnographic diplomacy when she is talking about this phenomenon… She says, if the Anonymous group members were to send her a pizza, it should please be gluten free. 🙂

Leslie T. Chang

Journalist

Understanding female factory workers… in China… Alienated workers? Or resourceful women in development? What matters is that these women learn, change and their families notice but they don’t really understand. These women learn English, because: Our customers in the future might not be Chinese, so languages are needed. 320 dollars bags taken home as gifts from the factories… family members at home could not understand why these items were selling for so much in the US… well, what matter to me, is that those women should earn more if the profit is so extreme…

Neil Harbisson

Sonochromatic Cyborg Artist

Our colorblind friend, Neil shows us how he is able to hear colors. When he started to dream in color, his brain started to produce sounds of colors. He is now a cyborg with his device, listening to Picasso. He now dresses in a way that sounds good. Or composing Lady Gaga salad… or Rachmaninow dishes. He creates sound portraits. Nicole Kidman’s face sounds good.

3:15 – 5:00

Session 6:

Misbehaving Beautifully

Sarah Caddick

Neuroscientist and Policy Advisor; Guest Host at TEDGlobal 2012

Read Montague

Behavioral Neuroscientist

Linking human brains in action around the world and measuring their interactive activity with fMRI machines.

Elyn Saks

Mental Health Law Scholar

A personal story of schizophrenia. In fact I know Elyn’s story from NPR. People like her are the ones who change the world, because she is changing people’s perceptions by opening up. And that is courage.

Ruby Wax

Comedian and Mental Health Activist

She says our pets are happier than we are. In a funny way she is out to remove the stigma from our brain being confused or overwhelmed in this century. Why is it, that you get sympathy for an illness of a specific organ, but no sympathy if your brain is sick. It is an organ you know. Full of chemicals, synaptic connections, electric signals, and it can break down just like a machine.

Vikram Patel

Healthcare advocate

People with mental illness live a shorter life, with a lower quality of life. Mental illnesses are leading causes of disability, like depression. How to use ordinary people to deliver mental health training to poor people, with serious impact… SUNDAR: Simplify, UNpack, Deliver health care, Affordable, Reallocate resources (SUNDAR… attractive in Hindi). Democratization of medical knowledge…

Wayne McGregor

Dancer and Choreographer

We are experts in physical thinking, he says… (but obviously, his kinesthetic intelligence is above average). He is turning the TED logo into movement spontaneously and his colleagues pick it up and repeat it in their own ways. It is really fun to watch. 🙂 The TED dance is born.

Natasha Paremski

Pianist

Classical music again. 🙂

Robert Legato

Visual Effects Guru

Brilliantly creative make-believe for the cinema lovers… Go see Hugo in 3D…

6:00 – 7:45

Session 7:

Long Term

Vicki Arroyo

Environmental Policy Influencer

What I am taking away from this: when natural disasters hit people, many are likely to stay in dangerous areas, because they are unable to evacuate their pets… and get killed together with them… so legislation has to change to allow people to escape with their pets. Vicki basically introduces intelligent design and policy that can protect people from natural disasters.

Jonathan Trent

Scientist and Biofuel Guru

OMEGA… a safe system at sea to make bio fuel by using micro algae and: increase bio diversity. Sounds good. Even open source!

Hassine Labaied

Wind Energy Innovator

He shows us a new kind of wind turbine system. Very interesting, and very effective, but also still in development.

Sarah-Jayne Blakemore

Cognitive Neuroscientist

Looking at the brains of teenagers. In late adolescence the pre-frontal cortex and other brain areas are optimized, and the amount of gray matter measurably decreases, so unnecessary connections are eliminated depending on the environment the person is in. So, take that into consideration when you educate young people.

Susan Solomon

Stem Cell Advocate

She is showing us a special video: an illness unfolds in front of our eyes by using human cells. Imagine your stem cell avatars being used for drug testing. Not only is this technology going to save lots of time and money for the pharmaceuticals, but also it could help you and me get targeted and safe medications when we need them (safely pretested and personalized).

We are informed that the TED Prize is now 1 000 000 USD and you can nominate yourself if you have a dream.

http://www.tedprize.org/

Usman Riaz

Percussive Guitarist

Preston Reed

Revolutionary Guitarist

Regina Saphier TED Global 2012 Day 1

Prezi Logo

Prezi Logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

12:00 – 13:45

Session 1:

Critical Crossroads

Don Tapscott

Visionary

Don tells the story of his neighbor open sourcing his gold mine geo data to find info and gold… In fact my father did the same for many years publishing photos of items in his collection asking: do you know who painted this? Because he knew, he can not possibly know it all… so he open sourced the research and it worked many times. Don says, it is the age of networked intelligence. Collective intelligence is able to solve huge problems in the world… Lets do this, he says. http://moxieinsight.com/

Shyam Sankar

Data Intelligence Agent

Fascinating high level data mining to find any info, people, and connections between info and people. Artificial and human intelligence combined…

Robyn Meredith

Journalist

China in the age of global economic crisis… the “factory of the world” in trouble when 20 million Chinese lost their jobs (and what about people in Hungary, 10 million people all together, who lost textile industry jobs by the hundreds of thousands due to the dirt cheap Chinese goods in the past… we no longer have a textile industry)… but their new middle class has spending power over there in China (we do not appear to have much of a middle class in Hungary)… Beijing wants innovation (Hungary has very little innovation… like Prezi… not much more, unfortunately… but at least Prezi has TED or rather Sapling as an investor… Ok, LogMeIn and UStream is also related to Hungary…)… China again wants to be innovative… like the gun powder… you know… made in China… The new economic “Big Brother”… Robyn says: “Today’s companies no longer make what they sell or no longer sell what they make.” China in its own way wants to make its people happy (unfortunately, Hungary’s leaders are not interested in Hungarian people’s happiness).

Jason Silva

Tech Filmmaker

According to Jason: “Awe is the best drug…” I have no comparison, I just love mental play and awesome ideas, art and talks. http://thisisjasonsilva.com/aboutme/

Raghu Dixit

Fusion Musician

Well, music…

James Stavridis

NATO Supreme Commander

He says, instead of walls, “use bridges” and gives us examples of social, cultural bridges creating security. NATO is using social networks as well you know. In many instances use soft power instead of hard power.

3:15 – 5:00

Session 2:

Tinker Make Do

Ellen Jorgensen

Biologist and Community Science Advocate

Ellen: “It’s a great time to be a molecular biologist!” So, now you can analyze your own genome… and use the data for genealogy research. DIY… you can also confront the dog owners about their dogs’ leftovers on the streets… You could do so many things in these new communities. GenSpace is the world’s first government-compliant DIY biotechnology lab.

Massimo Banzi

Physical Computing Guru

He showed us a couple of wonderful open source projects. A must see! This talk should be up soon! 🙂

Catarina Mota

Maker

She is a maker (originally a social scientist), using smart materials. She says, we should understand smart materials today, to be able to meaningfully use them.

Matt Mills and Tamara Roukaerts

Technologists

Aurasma, a startup that makes augmented-reality technology for mobile phones.

TED Fellows Director, Tom Rielly tells us about Max Little who invented an algorithm to detect Parkinson’s by using voice only.

Lee Cronin talks about chemistry apps in 3 minutes… 3D printers and chemical inks… print your own medicine… no need to go to your chemist in the future… “on the fly molecular assembly”…. own personal meta fabricator…

Antony Gormley

Sculptor

The body in space… light and darkness… very visual talk… he makes you disappear together… and turns you into an exhibit at the same time.

Kathy Hinde

Bird Piano Creator

Annoying TED “talk”.

Jamie Drummond

Anti-poverty activist

Lets do a global open source consultation about important issues. Collecting, connecting and committing. What do you want the next goals to be? He really wants to eliminate poverty by 2030.

6:00 – 7:45

Session 3:

Building Blocks

Daphne Koller

Daphne Koller

Educator

She is the person in this conference I am able to identify with most in terms of her goals. Free top higher education for all. Education might finally become a fundamental human right, life long learning will be a norm, and innovation is the goal. Her startup, Coursera, is working on just that. She spoke about the wonderful tools, people and outcomes. Top talk! Hope to see it online very very soon. I have an Ivy League degree (MA)… I live in Hungary now… I immediately discovered interesting courses on Coursera that I might take after the TED conference is over. I really love this idea… It would be really interesting to see if I could compile a DIY Interdisciplinary PhD on the Ivy level via Coursera from the best US universities… I have been looking forward to such an opportunity since I moved back to Hungary 10 years ago… Doing that as a game perhaps… like I described in one of my TED conversation comments to Jane McGonigal over a year ago… (Jane asked this: We spend 3 billion hours a week as a planet playing videogames. Is it worth it? How could it be MORE worth it?). Here is my shortened answer:

“I am not a gamer. I am an online idea generator…. Why not create a game that makes people in the developed world responsible for the education of people in the less developed parts of the world. There is now so much content out there for online education for free… I was thinking: Ivy League development, education, etc… students should be inspired by online games … you know, somehow combining education, mentoring, research and gaming… Get your degree as an online gamer by teaching people skills, showing them the world, interacting with them online and seeing results as we play. Learn from each other. Get your university credits with meaningful online games. … “online global community graduation” … I imagined getting an experimental PhD in such a way online (on top of my Columbia University MA) from my home in Budapest, Hungary while pulling someone else (living in a less fortunate environment) toward a BA or an MA degree. The game could have an academically meaningful impact beyond the epic win of teaching people skills, languages or science… I am sure many PhD students would be happier with this, instead of being the RA and TA slaves of tenured professors in the US… I could work with a post-doc who is in the US… so that person in the US, me in Hungary, and the person in the Third World: we would get to know each other’s needs and culture too and that with minimal carbon footprint. That could promote global power balance and understanding. This in my opinion would be a meaningful game project.”

Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng, the founders of Coursera

Shimon Schocken

Computer Scientist, Educator

Provide the environment for self study. Open source computer course… Grading is degrading… so he is telling us about upgrading. He is showing us a tool and my stream is gone… so I am sorry, but I have no way of knowing what he is talking about right now… will look it up from the archive later. But the tool he was showing looked similar to GeoGebra

Beau Lotto

Neuroscientist, Artist

+

Amy O’Toole

Student

How to change perception… Fascinating story of kids getting published with an original scientific study. Amy: Anyone can discover something new.

Eddie Obeng

Business Educator

Stop looking at the twenty first century with twentieth century eyes.

Karen Thompson Walker

Novelist

She is talking about fear in life and in literature.

Macy Gray

Singer/Songwriter

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LinkedIn update: “Richard Saul Wurman is now a connection”

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On June 5 Richard Saul Wurman posted my blog note on his facebook wall (helping my blog stats tremendously) and today he is my LinkedIn connection. 🙂 Is the person you are inspired by your LinkedIn connection? Should be! Feels really nice. 🙂 Hope to do good work together.

The Smithsonian National Design “Lifetime Achievement” Award goes to Richard Saul Wurman

Yesterday I got a few notes from Richard Saul Wurman. He made sure I know he got an award that made him really pleased.

Here is my edited letter to him (edited for the public eye):

Congratulations Richard upon your well deserved award! 🙂 “Lifetime Achievement” goes to Richard Saul Wurman. “Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt‘s National Design Awards“… Brilliant! Here is why You deserve it in my opinion:

 

I am sure you see that when You, Mr. Q Senior, started TED, you started many many possibilities for thousands of people on a global scale, unrelated to their immediate circumstances. You basically redesigned the invisible space between you, me, and people in other nations and on other continents. This is why you deserve every relevant award out there. It is all possible because you had a curious mind, an amazing breadth of view, and a special motivation for redesigning everything that you touch, in a way that it “becomes round” and “starts rolling” (e. g.: ready to roll when posted on the web). Thank you for existing and remaining curious! 🙂 Your embraced ignorance is a universal blessing, and we positively experience the function of your ego the size of The Large Hadron Collider. 🙂 We are happy particles spinning in it, and the energy is shaking up The World. Congratulations! Your “intelligent human design”, your hummingbird mind and your enormous network is the dynamic canvas of a global knowledge revolution.

Thank you for reinforcing your invitation to see your circles in person.

Ms. Q