Regina Saphier TED Global 2013 Day 4

I love this image! Michale Sandel, Harvard Philosopher is so much of a star in South Korea (his online Harvard lectures were translated into Korean), that he was invited there to kick off a major sporting event. This is our future! Brilliant intellectuals as stars and role models with integrity. I am fine with that.

The star philosopher, Michael Sandel in South Korea, as an opening attraction at a sporting event!

Friday, June 14, 2013

My blog dilemma is related to the fact that people are reading both my TED and my Coursera blogs from all over the world, that I can see from the stats, and some people even write to me, especially my Coursera readers, but I need more feedback to make sure my blogs are useful as they are. I mean I like to read the entire 4 days together after each TED event, it is nice to see it as a summarized and personalized stream of ideas… 🙂 However, due to its seasonality (2×4 days a year), following the two major TED events (for 4 years already), my new Coursera blog‘s readership is larger (after less than 1 year). Coursera that was one year old recently is regularly a hot topic in the media internationally, while TED is not so much… Of course at this point I am thinking: TED becoming 30 next year might cause the media to pay more attention to TED again. I like to write both blogs, but their exposure is different. It is why I am thinking about their future. And it just hit me, during the last 4 years I spent over a month of my life writing about the major TED conferences voluntarily (2x4x4=32 days all together). Until now, I spent half that time on my Coursera blogs, when I only regard the writing days (of course I also need to do research). So, my Coursera blog requires less writing time and gains more exposure on its own. (If I add my TED talk translations in the past, that is in fact a lot of valuable time, so I need to think hard how I allocate my time in the future. There is so much to write about, but I am only one person.)

Bruno opened in several languages (if I remember well, in French, Portuguese, Italian, German, Spanish and finally in English). I am sure he did that because Rives jokingly remarked yesterday that Bruno does not speak English. Not sure if Rives, who is a master of the English language could talk to us in half a dozen languages like Bruno does, so that intermezzo is now settled. I think it was rude of Rives, but I am sure Bruno’s joke that a speaker “stole” his book idea was no less questionable when it comes to being polite on stage while being watched by a global audience…

8:45 – 10:15am Session 11: Tech Impact

She spoke about social media’s protest capacity against the establishment and established beliefs.

Low cost computer for kids to learn coding.

Mr. EDx talking about MOOCs, like Coursera (Massive Open Online Courses). He is never mentioning Coursera, because that is their major competitor, leading the competition. The talk is more about “MOC”, “Massive Online Courses” (not Open) by schools giving degrees (like @ San Jose State University). A really successful and promising project. Licensing is an opportunity for EDx and Coursera equally. I think Coursera is more successful at this point, because their course diversity is huge, including the humanities. You can read more about Coursera and MOOCs on my other blog.

Storm Sandy revealed to her that the digital world is now a key part of our lives, as important as food and shelter. The “digital now” was immediately broken. Interesting to me, that she mentioned “Buda and Pest being divided by the Danube” (that she can find that out easily online now). 🙂 We live in a series of digital, virtual soap bubbles, and our time is artificially fragmented. Love is attention. Restore the flow of time and love. Take time back.

We need to be aware how technology is invading our privacy and learn to protect our data better. This is the time of big data, and we need to fight for privacy.

11:00 – 12:45pm Session 12: All Together Now

NGOs have the problem of scale. Business can create resources and achieve scale. Creating need at a profit. So, how do you use these profitable resources to solve social problems? Profit makes any project infinitely scalable, he says. Connecting social problems to businesses, based on shared values. Change how business sees itself, and change how others see business. I need more explanation Michael.

Not only can you pay for getting ahead in line, you can pay people to stand in line for you… Are we sure that this is good? Not really. He told the audience about an experiment, where kids were given 2 dollars for each book read to motivate them. It is however obvious to me that this does take away intrinsic motivation. Kids read more books, it turns out, but mainly shorter ones… and he did not say what happen after those kids did not get any more money… Without intrinsic motivation and without the financial incentive, why would those kids keep on reading? Anyway, buying your way ahead of the line is wrong… business should not be involved in everything. How do we want to live together? We need to define boundaries for business and people. Do you want to live in a society where you can get anything for money, or in one where things are important that money can not buy. Nice debate between the two speakers (Michael and Michael) after the two talks. I agree with Michael Sandel, markets should not overwhelm every realm of our lives.

When he was diagnosed with brain cancer he asked for an image of his cancer and could not get one initially! It is his own cancer! Finally, when he got it in a digital form, he could not open it, so needed to play with the data to make it visible. His own cancer! He started a website and open sourced his medical data to find a cure globally. I love this talk. He is fine now! 🙂

Investigating (the often global) networks behind corruption. Oh, I wish she started investigating in Hungary at the highest levels! This is very dangerous for her and for the activists, but this is also very important.

He is talking about gratefulness. I know what he is trying to explain. I wish my grateful moments, that I call “the moments of my inner smile” would be continuous. Last night on my balcony between 1:30 and 2:00 am I was watching the stars and the satellites and I was grateful. I spotted 4 satellites within 30 minutes. I felt the night was beautiful and I was grateful for being alive and witnessing this particular night. I might have to move to a convent to sustain these states of my mind, because others are not living gratefully and are not stopping to live mindfully, as David is suggesting. But I hope more and more people will be. 🙂 I also hope I will be able to sustain those periods longer and longer to become a better person, also when I am with others. I am doing well on my own, in one on one situations. I need more time, as do so many of us. It is a process: making the world a better place by making yourself more grateful more often. 🙂

Advertisements

Regina Saphier TED Global 2013 Day 1

Natasha Bedingfield

 

I am as usual in Hungary, more specifically in Budapest, and watching TED Global 2013 plus live blogging about it. Meanwhile in my district in Buda we have major flooding along the Danube, we also had several powerful storms like the one yesterday, we had two earthquakes during the last two months between 4.2 and 4.8, and Hungary is struggling economically (also in social terms and professionals are leaving by the thousands to find jobs abroad). My life too was full of hardship for the last few years. TED conferences gave me perspective, hope and intellectual resources. It was at a TED conference last year that I discovered Coursera and started another blog about it. Next year I am probably going to phase out my TED live conference blog after we celebrate 30 years of TED in 2014, and I am going to focus more on Coursera. I am still thinking about the future of my blogging… Let me know if you would like me to continue both blogs. By now I have solid experience in global blogging in English (as opposed to more limited local blogging in Hungarian) and I am thinking about new blog topics…

Coursera was anyway what I was really looking for in the first place when I stumbled upon TED many years ago… I had something to watch until Coursera finally manifested itself… Thank you Richard! Thank you Chris! Thank you TED speakers!

Lets see what is happening at TED Global this year. These are Edinburgh, Scotland times below, please look up your own local time relative to the program.

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

11:00 – 12:45pm Session 1: Moments of Truth

Generally I detest when politicians speak at TED. Still, this appeared to be a humble talk about democracy in crisis internationally. There was even some review of democracy’s history. Papandreou envisions the EU as a citizens’ “Agora”. Give immigrants a European citizenship, he says. Lets not be “Idiots” standing on our own, lets examine our issues together.

Talked about the sustainability strategy of IKEA and other major corporations.

He asked during his passionate talk: Why shouldn’t we all have a Serengeti on our doorsteps? Well, I am thinking: I am ok with the lions in Africa… And yes, whales are important for the existence of planktons… not only the other way round… but as the speaker himself pointed out: who are we to decide what kinds of animals get to live in our neighborhoods… Why would I want to let him decide?

From a land where driving a car by a woman is punished by direct harassment to her family… It happened to her, she was sent to jail, therefore she became an activist for the right to drive. Saudi Arabia was the last place where women could not drive and were punished for even attempting to drive once. It turns our, there was no law, this was some unwritten custom. There was her land and there was the rest of the world. She succeeded because others joined her protest and women are now driving in Saudi Arabia.

Saying no to the old school feminist narrative of putting your job first. Bread-winning and care-giving are equally important and governments should invest in both like Sweden and Norway does. Make care-giving cool for men. She is basically talking about humanizing society, accepting differences, and let people be who they want to be, the way they want to live. Finally she pointed out that she grew up in a time when her parents were smoking, and when racial segregation was the norm. She pointed out that change is happening, but how fast, that depends on us.

2:15 – 4:00pm Session 2: Those Flying Things

Amazing demo of drones in flight indoors. Balancing a glass of water in the air by a drone? No problem.

Explaining the flexibility of conservation drones. Low cost tools to survey huge areas.

Using drones in logistics. Getting supplies, like medication to areas that are unreachable on roads. The cost is low, the speed is high. The beginning of a new paradigm in transportation? (Get your sushi by a drone in no time and make all delivery people jobless…hmm…? I always have this dilemma…) Engage in social fiction to make it happen: lift people out of poverty… (but do it so that you do not push others into poverty).

Weaponized drones are still controlled by humans but human control for them to work as tools of killing: no longer a technical requirement. Autonomous operation is part of them. The capability is there already. Drones today are able to make the decision to kill a human on their own! Is this the future we want? Robots killing people? Pushing responsibility away from humans…? Anonymous war? Will you know your enemy? How can you protect yourself from such faceless attackers hiding behind robotic weapons…? Advanced nations are data driven and opinion leaders are easily identified by their data and social network usage. Easy targets. This could suffocate free speech. We need a treaty on robotic weapons. No robot privacy in public places!

3D panorama imaging demonstrated by one of my favorite TED speakers, Blaise (such a nice man). As you walk your camera takes photos and stitches them into a flow of images.

Looking at  the forest and landscapes with bio sensors from the air. Greg shows us how he is able to deeply analyze the forest with his spectrometer, showing the biodiversity, living and dead trees, their growth rate, the impact of animals and human activity (like illegal gold-mining). Brilliant technology.

5:00 – 6:45pm Session 3: Exquisite Enigmatic Us

Sleep is vital! The quality of your sleep impacts your mental health.

Our minds are able to mislead us when it comes to memories. Memories can even be artificially planted into human minds.

Mixing culture, language and media heroes.

Speaking to us about the brain’s thermostat when it comes to weight gain or weight loss. It feels like Sandra experienced a lot of trauma and her anxiety level is very high to tolerate the stress of the TED stage. Remember, have compassion, do not judge, rather ask: What happened to her? And in her TED talk she talks about that… I feel how she is struggling. It took her a lot of courage to go on stage and speak about eating, culture, mind, body and anxiety.

Excellent speaker, just like Jane, her twin sister, who is now a regular TED speaker. Still, I am not entirely convinced Kelly… I think all this sounded way too idealistic: you now believe (after believing the opposite for 10 years) that stress is making us stronger… you are less likely to pass away from stress related causes and are more likely to become successful at the task that is stressful, if you think stress helps you do what you do. Why am I not convinced?

Kelly McGonigal

She told us, if you believe stress is bad for you, your blood vessels contract during stressful events, while if you believe that stress is good for you, your blood vessels relax. This could be, yes, but what if you were traumatized in the past, and no matter what you think, your blood vessels just keep contracting due to neurological or genetic damage? Also, she stated that while financial stress raises your risk factor by some 30%, taking care of someone removes that risk… due to the wonderful impact of a famous stress hormone: oxytocin. This contradicts Christakis’s findings regarding care taking, networks and stress (often killing the caretaker and stressing out friends and family in your network), and also contradicts the Columbia U. research regarding higher status and stress… the higher your status the better you handle stress… So, this new finding of yours needs more examination, perhaps another 10 years.

Still, I am sure what you think of stress and what your attitude is like, that does impact your body via your mind, definitely.

Related articles

Regina’s other blog! NEW!: My Coursera Blog

While you are waiting for MY TED Long Beach 2013

Live Conference notes

I recommend my NEW! blog regarding

the global and online higher education start up

Coursera that provides free courses at the Ivy League level:

MY COURSERA BLOG

Regina Saphier TED Global 2012 Day 1

Prezi Logo

Prezi Logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

12:00 – 13:45

Session 1:

Critical Crossroads

Don Tapscott

Visionary

Don tells the story of his neighbor open sourcing his gold mine geo data to find info and gold… In fact my father did the same for many years publishing photos of items in his collection asking: do you know who painted this? Because he knew, he can not possibly know it all… so he open sourced the research and it worked many times. Don says, it is the age of networked intelligence. Collective intelligence is able to solve huge problems in the world… Lets do this, he says. http://moxieinsight.com/

Shyam Sankar

Data Intelligence Agent

Fascinating high level data mining to find any info, people, and connections between info and people. Artificial and human intelligence combined…

Robyn Meredith

Journalist

China in the age of global economic crisis… the “factory of the world” in trouble when 20 million Chinese lost their jobs (and what about people in Hungary, 10 million people all together, who lost textile industry jobs by the hundreds of thousands due to the dirt cheap Chinese goods in the past… we no longer have a textile industry)… but their new middle class has spending power over there in China (we do not appear to have much of a middle class in Hungary)… Beijing wants innovation (Hungary has very little innovation… like Prezi… not much more, unfortunately… but at least Prezi has TED or rather Sapling as an investor… Ok, LogMeIn and UStream is also related to Hungary…)… China again wants to be innovative… like the gun powder… you know… made in China… The new economic “Big Brother”… Robyn says: “Today’s companies no longer make what they sell or no longer sell what they make.” China in its own way wants to make its people happy (unfortunately, Hungary’s leaders are not interested in Hungarian people’s happiness).

Jason Silva

Tech Filmmaker

According to Jason: “Awe is the best drug…” I have no comparison, I just love mental play and awesome ideas, art and talks. http://thisisjasonsilva.com/aboutme/

Raghu Dixit

Fusion Musician

Well, music…

James Stavridis

NATO Supreme Commander

He says, instead of walls, “use bridges” and gives us examples of social, cultural bridges creating security. NATO is using social networks as well you know. In many instances use soft power instead of hard power.

3:15 – 5:00

Session 2:

Tinker Make Do

Ellen Jorgensen

Biologist and Community Science Advocate

Ellen: “It’s a great time to be a molecular biologist!” So, now you can analyze your own genome… and use the data for genealogy research. DIY… you can also confront the dog owners about their dogs’ leftovers on the streets… You could do so many things in these new communities. GenSpace is the world’s first government-compliant DIY biotechnology lab.

Massimo Banzi

Physical Computing Guru

He showed us a couple of wonderful open source projects. A must see! This talk should be up soon! 🙂

Catarina Mota

Maker

She is a maker (originally a social scientist), using smart materials. She says, we should understand smart materials today, to be able to meaningfully use them.

Matt Mills and Tamara Roukaerts

Technologists

Aurasma, a startup that makes augmented-reality technology for mobile phones.

TED Fellows Director, Tom Rielly tells us about Max Little who invented an algorithm to detect Parkinson’s by using voice only.

Lee Cronin talks about chemistry apps in 3 minutes… 3D printers and chemical inks… print your own medicine… no need to go to your chemist in the future… “on the fly molecular assembly”…. own personal meta fabricator…

Antony Gormley

Sculptor

The body in space… light and darkness… very visual talk… he makes you disappear together… and turns you into an exhibit at the same time.

Kathy Hinde

Bird Piano Creator

Annoying TED “talk”.

Jamie Drummond

Anti-poverty activist

Lets do a global open source consultation about important issues. Collecting, connecting and committing. What do you want the next goals to be? He really wants to eliminate poverty by 2030.

6:00 – 7:45

Session 3:

Building Blocks

Daphne Koller

Daphne Koller

Educator

She is the person in this conference I am able to identify with most in terms of her goals. Free top higher education for all. Education might finally become a fundamental human right, life long learning will be a norm, and innovation is the goal. Her startup, Coursera, is working on just that. She spoke about the wonderful tools, people and outcomes. Top talk! Hope to see it online very very soon. I have an Ivy League degree (MA)… I live in Hungary now… I immediately discovered interesting courses on Coursera that I might take after the TED conference is over. I really love this idea… It would be really interesting to see if I could compile a DIY Interdisciplinary PhD on the Ivy level via Coursera from the best US universities… I have been looking forward to such an opportunity since I moved back to Hungary 10 years ago… Doing that as a game perhaps… like I described in one of my TED conversation comments to Jane McGonigal over a year ago… (Jane asked this: We spend 3 billion hours a week as a planet playing videogames. Is it worth it? How could it be MORE worth it?). Here is my shortened answer:

“I am not a gamer. I am an online idea generator…. Why not create a game that makes people in the developed world responsible for the education of people in the less developed parts of the world. There is now so much content out there for online education for free… I was thinking: Ivy League development, education, etc… students should be inspired by online games … you know, somehow combining education, mentoring, research and gaming… Get your degree as an online gamer by teaching people skills, showing them the world, interacting with them online and seeing results as we play. Learn from each other. Get your university credits with meaningful online games. … “online global community graduation” … I imagined getting an experimental PhD in such a way online (on top of my Columbia University MA) from my home in Budapest, Hungary while pulling someone else (living in a less fortunate environment) toward a BA or an MA degree. The game could have an academically meaningful impact beyond the epic win of teaching people skills, languages or science… I am sure many PhD students would be happier with this, instead of being the RA and TA slaves of tenured professors in the US… I could work with a post-doc who is in the US… so that person in the US, me in Hungary, and the person in the Third World: we would get to know each other’s needs and culture too and that with minimal carbon footprint. That could promote global power balance and understanding. This in my opinion would be a meaningful game project.”

Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng, the founders of Coursera

Shimon Schocken

Computer Scientist, Educator

Provide the environment for self study. Open source computer course… Grading is degrading… so he is telling us about upgrading. He is showing us a tool and my stream is gone… so I am sorry, but I have no way of knowing what he is talking about right now… will look it up from the archive later. But the tool he was showing looked similar to GeoGebra

Beau Lotto

Neuroscientist, Artist

+

Amy O’Toole

Student

How to change perception… Fascinating story of kids getting published with an original scientific study. Amy: Anyone can discover something new.

Eddie Obeng

Business Educator

Stop looking at the twenty first century with twentieth century eyes.

Karen Thompson Walker

Novelist

She is talking about fear in life and in literature.

Macy Gray

Singer/Songwriter

Enhanced by Zemanta